My9s

informal musings

The Quandary of the Young Academic and #twittergate

About a week ago, in the between SGA phone calls and Juxta testing, I found myself looking at another digital product: Twitter.  In particular, I found myself reading tweets and retweets, blog posts and articles about what has since become known as #twittergate.  (I have to take a moment here to thank Annie Swafford, who […]

Digital Scholarship and Humanities Reform

Heather Bowlby is a PhD student in Victorian Literature at the University of Virginia and 2011-2012 NINES Fellow. In a recent article in The Chronicle, “How Not to Reform Humanities Scholarship,” Gary Olson addresses the role of emerging digital methodologies in efforts to reform humanities scholarship. The increasing call to refashion humanities research by means […]

Haunted Texts, or, My What-I-Did-Last-Summer Essay

I recently had the experience of being interviewed for a newspaper article about the Rare Book School, where I work part time. The reporter, a forthright sort of journalist with a minimally cynical affect, told me his angle right from the beginning: the book, it seems—that is, the physical book, that persistent little brick of […]

An Informal Review of the Google Art Project: Part II of II

[Sarah Storti is a NINES Fellow for the 2010-2011 year and an MA Candidate in English at the University of Virginia.] Many interesting questions about the project have been posed already, by people who apparently do have Twitter (unlike me… see the first half of this post from 2/24). I really enjoyed Brian Croxall’s post […]

An Informal Review of the Google Art Project: Part I of II

[Sarah Storti is a NINES Fellow for the 2010-2011 year and an MA Candidate in English at the University of Virginia.] Criticism, skepticism, and healthy resistance are all very well and good, but I must say that in spite of my determined efforts to maintain a critical distance from Google, the company does tend to […]

The beauty of data visualization

In this TED talk, David McCandless shares why he loves data visualization, and how it can help us make sense of “information glut.” I post it here not only because most of us in the Digital Humanities are fascinated by data visualization, but also to tease out your thoughts on some of the concepts he […]

Control your vocab (or not)

[Jean Bauer ( Ph.D. Candidate, Corcoran Department of History, University of Virginia), NINES Fellow for 2009-2010 school year] Yesterday I had two conversations about controlled vocabulary in digital humanities projects (a.k.a. my definition of a really good day).  Both conversations centered around the same question: what is the best way to associate documents with subject […]

Accessibility Debate

[Heather Bowlby (Ph.D. Candidate, Department of English, University of Virginia) is a graduate intern at NINES for the 2009-2010 school year] I attended an interesting presentation last week by Timothy Powell on his digitalization project at the Penn Museum’s Native American Center. As director of the Digital Partnerships with Indian Communities group, Mr. Powell works […]