My9s

american studies

grinding ] gnashing: Juxta collation of Delany’s Blake yields insights into the novel’s uncertain conclusion

Martin R. Delany was an African American abolitionist and political activist.  His only novel, Blake, or, the Huts of America, features runaway slave Henry Blake, who travels through the American South disseminating a “secret” which implicitly foments a slave rebellion, although such is never explicitly stated.  Although Delany sought to have the novel published as […]

Work Flows and Wish Lists: Reflections on Juxta as an Editorial Tool

Work Flows and Wish Lists: Reflections on Juxta as an Editorial Tool

I have had the opportunity to use Juxta Commons for several editorial projects, and while taking a breath between a Juxta-intensive term project last semester and my Juxta-intensive MA thesis this semester, I would like to offer a few thoughts on Juxta as an editorial tool. For my term project for Jerome McGann’s American Historiography […]

Image of the Week: New Arrivals

Image of the Week: New Arrivals

In honor of my new arrival here at NINES, please enjoy an image of the week that celebrates all things new and in movement. The photograph above, “New York Arrives,” shows the U.S.S. City of New York and comes from the George Grantham Bain Collection at the Library of Congress.

Image of the Week: Battle of Chattanooga

Image of the Week: Battle of Chattanooga

This chromolithograph, produced in 1880, depicts the 1863 Chattanooga Campaign of the Civil War.  After a series of successful attacks led by U.S. Grant on November 23-24, the Federals would hold the “Gateway to the Lower South” until the end of the War.  For more Civil War artwork, check out the Library of Congress Civil […]

Image of the Week: Baseball

Now that football season is officially over, we can look forward to enjoying America’s pastime.  In honor of African American History Month, here’s a photograph of Morris Brown College’s baseball team, circa 1899 or 1900.  Courtesy of the Daniel Murray Collection from the Library of Congress.

Image of the Week: Whittier’s study

From the Pageant of America collection at the New York Public Library, NINES offers this glimpse into the study of Fireside Poet John Greenleaf Whittier, and the “Desk upon which Snow-Bound and other poems were written.”

Image + text: the Gettysburg Address

  To accompany this week’s image, NINES Fellow Elizabeth Fox assembled all five copies of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address into one comparison set in Juxta Commons and collated them to see how they differ.  Use the embed window below to peruse a heat map of this collation, with the Nicolay Copy as the base text. […]

Image of the Week: American Heritage

Image of the Week: American Heritage

After hearing an NPR interview on Columbus Day with Timothy Egan, author of Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher: The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis, I decided to share a particularly striking example of Curtis’ work.  Curtis’ portraits, taken at the beginning of the twentieth century, document and commemorate the lives and […]

Image of the Week: Ad for Panorama of Pilgrim’s Progress

John Bunyan’s allegorical narrative, The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World to That Which Is To Come (1678) was an extraordinarily popular work of religious literature, even through the nineteenth century. This advertisement from the Library of Congress’ American Time Capsule Collection, invites visitors to see a panoramic exhibition of the famous religious narrative, and promises […]